Afri-Leo Walk for Lions 2008

Afri-Leo is a Namibian Charity Organization, involved with the plight of lions in Namibia.In conjunction with Wild At Heart Safaris, the “Walk for lions-2008” was launched from the 30th of April until the 15th of May.

The aim of the trip was twofold:
1. Raise funds for Afri-Leo and;
2. Make people aware of the Human Wildlife Conflict situation in Namibia.

About the Author: Kobus Alberts is 34 years of age and is married with 2 children. He was born in Usakos, Namibia, and is currently living in Swakopmund. He holds a diploma in Nature Conservation and has spent 11 Years of his life living in most of the National Parks and Game Reserves of Namibia. He has most recently been heading up the National Marine Aquarium of Namibia in Swakopmund, a position he held for 5 years and is now a director of Wild at Heart Safaris and Namibian owned travel company unique is that it was established entirely by ex-game rangers with a love of thier country.  email: info@wildatheartsafaris.com

The group that came on the safari consisted out of 14 Swiss Students, 12 Local Namibian Students, 3 Film Crew members and 5 supporters for Terre-Et Fauna, which is a Swiss based charity organization.
The local team consisted of a Wild At Heart Safaris Member, Kaurimbi Expeditions that were involved with all the logistics and Tammy Hoth of Afri-Leo

The Safari started at Kavita Lion Lodge, home of the Afri-Leo Foundation. This was to be our base camp for 2 nights. The activities in this area were mainly an introduction to the whole safari, observing lions while feeding, and the Swiss and Namibian students to get to know each other.
The following two days the group visited the communal area bordering Etosha National Park. The Khoa di //Hoas Conservancy area was the first, and the group walked from village to village and interviewed people in these different villages. The interviews mainly focused on the Human Wildlife Conflict and how it affects these people and their way of life.

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Naukluft Mountains Hike, Namibia

The 8 Day Naukluft Hike is reputably the toughest of its kind in Southern Africa. This was found to be true, by both guide and client of Wild At Heart Safaris.

info@wildatheartsafaris.com

Author: Kobus Alberts is 34 years of age and is married with 2 children. He was born in Usakos, Namibia, and is currently living in Swakopmund. He holds a diploma in Nature Conservation and has spent 11 Years of his life living in most of the National Parks and Game Reserves of Namibia. He has most recently been heading up the National Marine Aquarium of Namibia in Swakopmund, a position he held for 5 years.

The safari started in Windhoek. After collecting Mr. Eran Wieder from the airport we drove South towards the Namib Naukluft Park.  After a good nights rest at Tsauchab tented camp the highest dunes in the world were viewed. Sossusvlei and Deadvlei were seen during this day of travel. That afternoon we booked into Hikers Haven, at the Naukluft campsite. After sharing out the necessary food for the coming 8 Day hike, we settled down and had a last big meal.

Waking up at 05:30 with butterflies, we had a last quick coffee and then started the walk at 06:50. Our rucksacks weighed in at about 20 Kilograms for Eran and about 22 Kilograms for me. After an hour of walking we took the first of many rest stops we would have that day.
We slowly started with the climb, and what looked like a little hill, turned into a murderous walk, and both of us got to the top tired, and slightly shocked at the sudden turn of events. This was the start of many climbs that we will encounter during this walk.

After passing the fig Tree fountain we climbed even higher, and then had a well deserved lunch break. During lunch I went in search of more fountains, but found none. Luckily for us we were not very far from our first shelter, Die Putte.

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Keeper of the Stars – Conservation in the far north of Namibia

It was January, 1999. As a Nature Conservation officer in the Nyae Nyae and Khaudum National Park areas in northeastern Namibia, I had been called out to Boebi post where Wild Dogs had killed three cattle.

About the Author: Andries Alberts, Game Warden of Bushmanland and the Nya Nya conservation area.   Find out more here.

!Xashe was a bushman belonging to the Ju’hoansi tribe, and it was him whom had suffered the loss.

!Xashe had seen many moons, his skin was rumpled with the years gone by. As we sat down together he explained to me what had happened.

Fourteen Cape Wild Dogs had killed three of !Xashe’s milking cows. Taking notes for my report, I explained to him that unfortunately there was no compensation for damages incurred by wildlife and that there was very little that we could do for him. His voice was soft and gentle as he told me that he understood.

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